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Cromford Camp 2024
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The Cromford Canal once stretched for 14 miles from the top of the Erewash Canal at Langley Mill to Cromford.  The Friends of the Cromford Canal aim to eventually reopen it all the way through, but there will be several difficult lengths to restore, where the canal is blocked by road and railway crossings, a collapsed tunnel, and sections which have been lost to opencast coal mining.

Initially, restoration work has been concentrated on the better preserved sections including the Cromford end, and sections at Ironville and near Ambergate, even though these will remain isolated lengths for some years to come. But more recently planning permission has been obtained for the current Beggarlee project, to reopen the first length from Langley Mill, which will allow visiting boats from the rest of the waterways network to continue northwards via two new locks which will be built in the coming years.  When the initial length is open, the aim is to continue northwards towards Ironville.

The original route of the canal has been lost under the A610 main road, so a new route will be created, crossing the road via an old railway bridge. Because this new canal route will run across what is designated as floodplain land, there is a requirement to create an alternative area for any floodwater to go.  The spoil excavated from this area will be used to build up the embankment for the new canal channel.

The work on this Camp will be using dumpers and excavators to create a flood storage compensation area by the River Erewash near the canal’s route at Beggarlee, and possibly starting construction of a new section of the canal channel and towpath.

 

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Event Dates

20th to 27th July

Location

Langley Mill, Nottinghamshire

Restoration

Cromford Canal Camp 2024

The Cromford Canal once stretched for 14 miles from the top of the Erewash Canal at Langley Mill to Cromford.  The Friends of the Cromford Canal aim to eventually reopen it all the way through, but there will be several difficult lengths to restore, where the canal is blocked by road and railway crossings, a collapsed tunnel, and sections which have been lost to opencast coal mining.

Initially, restoration work has been concentrated on the better preserved sections including the Cromford end, and sections at Ironville and near Ambergate, even though these will remain isolated lengths for some years to come. But more recently planning permission has been obtained for the current Beggarlee project, to reopen the first length from Langley Mill, which will allow visiting boats from the rest of the waterways network to continue northwards via two new locks which will be built in the coming years.  When the initial length is open, the aim is to continue northwards towards Ironville.

The original route of the canal has been lost under the A610 main road, so a new route will be created, crossing the road via an old railway bridge. Because this new canal route will run across what is designated as floodplain land, there is a requirement to create an alternative area for any floodwater to go.  The spoil excavated from this area will be used to build up the embankment for the new canal channel.

The work on this Camp will be using dumpers and excavators to create a flood storage compensation area by the River Erewash near the canal’s route at Beggarlee, and possibly starting construction of a new section of the canal channel and towpath.

 

Details

Activity

Using dumpers and excavators to create a flood storage compensation area.

Accommodation

A nearby social club

Cost

£80

About The Camp

Where is it? 

Just north of Langley Mill, Nottinghamshire

 

 

 

 

Contacts

If you want to find out more about any of our Canal Camp working holidays, please get in touch.
Phone 01494 783453 extn 607

Email [email protected]

View event location

Location

Langley Mill, Nottinghamshire

Langley Mill, UK

Find directions to the Event

Events

Waterway underfunding

Hundreds of miles of waterways – along with their unique heritage and habitats – are currently starved of funding and rely on constant lobbying by us to safeguard their future.

Sustainable Boating

We want boating on canals and rivers to be more sustainable and – even though the current overall contribution to UK carbon emissions is very small – we want to help reduce emissions on the waterways.

Waterways Heritage at Risk

Britain’s canals and rivers are a unique, living heritage. But that heritage is at risk – from urban development, lack of protection, loss of skills and knowledge and climate change.

You can help Save Waterways Heritage.

Waterway restoration

Restoring the UK’s blue infrastructure – our inherited network of navigable canals and rivers – is good for people and places.